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The National Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, organizer of the annual Academy Awards presentation, purchased green tags from the Bonneville Environmental Foundation (BEF) to offset this year's Academy Awards telecast, Governor's Ball, Road to the Oscars Pre-Show, and the Red Carpet Event.

The combined purchase of 178 green tags supports the generation of 178,000 kWh of electricity from renewable energy projects, which is enough to power 16 average U.S. homes for a year, BEF says. By purchasing the green tags, the Academy Awards prevented nearly 250,000 pounds of greenhouse gas emissions from being released into the atmosphere.

"The Academy's commitment to addressing the environmental impacts of the Oscars ceremony reflects the increasing attention to the risks of climate disruption within the arts and entertainment industry," says Tom Starrs, BEF's chief operating officer.

The purchase was coordinated by Allen Hershkowitz, senior scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council. According to Hershkowitz, "The Academy's purchase of green tags for Oscar-related events increases public awareness of the opportunity to reduce the environmental impacts of our energy usage, particularly with respect to carbon dioxide."


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