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The Idaho State University (ISU) Energy Systems Technology and Education Center is offering two new associate of applied science degree programs this fall: energy systems mechanical engineering technology (MET) and energy systems wind engineering technology (WET).

The two-year WET program will train technicians to install, maintain and service wind turbines. The program provides coursework in electrical and mechanical engineering, as well as necessary training to climb towers safely and develop the specialized skills and training necessary for the growing wind industry.

Students in the WET program of study will learn on two turbines donated by G3 LLC, which purchased the turbines from Lewandowski Farms. One turbine and tower will be used for training purposes; the other will be an operating turbine that will generate electricity near ISU.

The two-year MET program will train engineering technicians to work in the mechanical portions of a power plant. Technicians in this field of study will work on turbines, pumps, piping and valves in power systems that often produce more than 250,000 horsepower.

For more information: isu.edu/estec.

Location: Pocatello, Idaho.


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