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The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) has made $640,000 in grants available to fund clean-energy-related science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs for K-12 students.

The grants, part of MassCEC's Workforce Capacity Building Program, will target projects that help build STEM skills in elementary and secondary students, and that boost the number of high-school graduates pursuing STEM majors in college.

"The clean energy sector is an example of a growing, innovative industry in Massachusetts, and we need to excite and encourage more students to study STEM and pursue careers in this thriving industry," says Massachusetts Lieutenant Gov. Timothy Murray, chairman of the governor’s STEM Advisory Council.

“Exposing educators and students to science and technology will prepare the next generation of clean energy workers for the high-paying jobs of tomorrow,” adds Massachusetts Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Rick Sullivan, who serves as the chairman of MassCEC’s board of directors. “Bringing clean energy professionals together with educators and students will only boost the already-booming clean energy sector in Massachusetts.”

MassCEC is now accepting grant proposals for programs that develop and integrate clean energy- and STEM-related curricula; create practical problem-solving projects to address student skill development; or provide clean energy and STEM-focused career exposure or work experience opportunities for both educators and students.

Ideal programs will also engage the clean energy industry in the classroom by providing dual enrollment programs that allow high-school students to take college courses, offering high-school internships for low-income youths, and developing activities and practical laboratories for applied science in the clean energy field.

Applications are due May 3, and a webinar on the program and application process will be held March 8 at 2 p.m. To register for the webinar, email anatella©masscec.com.

More information is available here.



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