in News Departments > Policy Watch
print the content item

Sens. Mark Udall, D-Colo.; Michael Bennet, D-Colo.; Jon Tester, D-Mont.; and Dean Heller, R-Nev., have introduced legislation that would streamline the permitting process for renewable energy projects on public lands.

The Public Lands Renewable Energy Development Act creates a leasing pilot project to establish a straightforward development process that treats renewable energy - including wind and solar - similar to traditional sources of energy development, such as oil and natural-gas projects, the senators explain.

Currently, obtaining permits for wind and solar projects on public lands can take several years. The senators say the proposed bill would reduce the number of steps required by law and make it easier for companies to make long-term plans. The changes would also increase local governments' revenue and certainty by establishing a more predictable and direct royalty system from renewables that will support conservation, the senators add.

"We in Colorado and across America are blessed with abundant wind, solar and geothermal resources that are ready to power our nation, create jobs and grow our economy,” Udall says. “We should develop these resources in a responsible, sustainable way.

“That's why I joined a bipartisan group of my colleagues to introduce legislation to improve the way we develop and use the renewable energy resources on our public lands,” he adds. “By directing a portion of the revenues from these leases to state and local governments - as well as to conservation - this bill will help support our schools and rebuild infrastructure while conserving the land and water that our rural economies depend on."

The legislation is co-sponsored by Sens. Max Baucus, D-Mont.; Martin Heinrich, D-N.M.; Jim Risch, R-Idaho; and Tom Udall, D-N.M.



Trachte Inc._id1770
Latest Top Stories

Setting The Record Straight: How Many Birds Do Wind Turbines Really Kill?

Several peer-reviewed studies are more or less in agreement with avian mortality rates caused by wind turbines. However, one study, which is wildly off from the others, is most often cited in the media. Why?


Six Takeaways From The IRS' Start Of Construction Guidance: What You Need To Know

The IRS recently issued guidance to wind developers to further spell out what "start of construction" means. Will you be covered?


Eagle Take Permits For Wind Farms - Will They Fly?

Now that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has issued the first permit allowing the legal take of eagles, can wind developers expect more certainty in the agency's application process?


Despite 2013 Challenges, U.S. Wind Power Reaches All-Time Low Price

In a new report, the U.S. Department of Energy details the highs and lows of the country's wind industry last year, and the agency maintains that the U.S. sector remains strong.


Mexico On Pace To Set New Renewables Investment Record

A new report says the country has spent $1.3 billion on clean energy in the first half of 2014 and could end up seeing a record year. Furthermore, wind power is slated for significant growth in the region.

Canwea_id1984
Renewable NRG_id1934
Tower Conference_id1965