171502.jpg

AWEA_id1981

HHI Installs
Offshore Prototype

Hyundai Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (HHI) has completed the installation of its 5.5 MW offshore wind turbine prototype at the Kimnyeong Wind Farm, located on Jeju Island in South Korea.

The company says the offshore wind turbine, featuring a 100-meter hub height and 140-meter rotor diameter, is designed to withstand strong winds of 62.5 m/s and to be protected from corrosion caused by seawater.

HHI will start a test run on the turbine this month to obtain certification within this year, and a company official adds that HHI plans to speed up its marketing campaign for the turbine overseas in regions such as Europe.

For more information, visit english.hhi.co.kr.

 

Fraunhofer Builds
Oil Sensor Test Stand

The Fraunhofer Institute for Wind Energy and Energy System Technology (IWES) is constructing an oil sensor test stand on its grounds in Bremerhaven, Germany.

As the institute explains, wind turbines are increasingly being equipped with oil sensors to monitor the condition of the gearboxes, and the project aims to provide standardized oil sensing testing for the industry. IWES says the focuses of the tests are reliability, accuracy and oil sensor operational capability.

“The operational conditions in gearbox oil-circuits for varying installation environments can be simulated here,” explains Dr. Claus Kupferschmidt, leader of the DegradO project at IWES. “Furthermore, degrees of gearbox oil aging under changing operational conditions and with regard to contaminating pollutants such as wear debris, water and dust can also be simulated.”

IWES expects the oil test stand will be completed in September, at which point the first tests on oil sensors made by various producers will then be carried out.

For more information, visit iwes.fraunhofer.de.

 

Campaign Includes
Galion Lidar

An investigation into the capabilities of remote scanning LIDARs to measure wind turbulence was recently conducted as part of a collaboration between renewable energy consultancy SgurrEnergy, the University of Oklahoma and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

SgurrEnergy’s laser-based remote sensing device, Galion Lidar, was used to gather the measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in northern Oklahoma. Alongside a selection of other measurement devices, Galion Lidar was deployed to measure using a tri-doppler technique to calculate zonal, meridional and vertical wind speed components every second so that the mean wind speed and turbulence statistics could be calculated, according to SgurrEnergy.

The company says the comparison of device results showed that the tri-doppler technique, conducted by Galion, recorded larger variances in mean wind speeds and measured small scales of turbulence that were not picked up by a standard LIDAR scanning strategy. SgurrEnergy claims the techniques used in this measurement campaign show that LIDAR technology has the ability to measure high-frequency turbulence in wind energy applications.

For more information, visit sgurrenergy.com.

 

WindSim Launches
Cloud Solution

WindSim AS, a provider of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the wind industry, has launched its WindSim Cloud solution, a service reporting the annual energy production for planned or existing wind farms.

“Access to powerful computing resources makes cloud simulations attractive and offers an alternative to running simulations locally,” says John Olaf Romma, CEO of WindSim AS, later adding, “Everyone can run cloud simulations on a pay-per-project basis. WindSim Cloud nicely complements the existing full-fetched WindSim CFD software suite.”

According to the company, WindSim Cloud runs in geographically dispersed data centers that comply with key industry standards, such as ISO/IEC 27001:2005, for security and reliability. In addition to data center, network and personnel security practices, WindSim Cloud incorporates security practices at the application and platform layers, the company notes.

For more information, visit windsim.com.

 

Floating Foundation
Receives U.S. Patent

Germany-based engineering company GICON has received a U.S. patent for its SOF floating offshore wind turbine foundation. The company’s patent lasts until July 2017, with an extended protection running until January 2029.

According to GICON, the SOF can be deployed in both shallow water (from 65 ft. onwards) and deep water (up to 1,640 ft.). The company has conducted small-scale tests, and deployment of a full-scale model is planned for 2014/2015.

“The USA will be one of the leading markets for offshore wind development in the future. Therefore, it is an important step for GICON to achieve patent protection for our SOF in the U.S. market,” says GICON CEO Jochen Grossmann.

For more information, visit gicon.de. w

Products & Technology

HHI Installs Offshore Prototype

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NAW_body hyperlink NAW_body_i NAW_body_bi NAW_body_b_i NAW_body_b

NAW_first_graph

NAW_depbio

NAW_sub

NAW_last_graph

AuthorBio

NAW_SH

NAW_SH_no_rule

NAW_SH norule

NAW_SH_norule

NAW_SH_first_item

pullquote

sidebar_headline