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Toshiba International Corp. has established U.S.-based sales and technical support for its new product, the Super Charge Ion Battery, (SCiB). Toshiba says this lithium-based technology reaches 90% of its charge in less than five minutes and features a life span exceeding 10 years.

The company adds that the SCiB features minimal capacity loss, even following thousands of rapid charge/discharge cycles, and up to 85% usable capacity without compromising the product’s cycle life. The battery's discharge rate is equivalent to that of an ultracapacitor, and it maintains performance at very low temperatues (down to –30 degrees C), Toshiba says.

The SCiB team, headquartered in Houston, will focus on business development activities, battery-pack design, prototyping, assembly, technical support and service. Initial market development will focus on electric vehicles, smart grid/grid storage applications and wind and solar projects.

SOURCE: Toshiba


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