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Vestas has released the findings of the investigation into what caused one of its V112-3.0 MW wind turbines to catch fire on March 30.

According to the company, the fire started in the harmonic filter cabinet as a result of a loose connection in the electrical system that created an arc flash.

To resolve the problem, Vestas says it will use a different type of washer on the electrical connections in the harmonic filter cabinet.

The solution is in the process of being implemented in the affected turbines, and customers are being informed. At the site, the burned nacelle has been replaced and is scheduled to be commissioned next week.

Most of the paused V112 turbines have been restarted or are in the process of being restarted. Vestas says that as it returns the paused turbines to normal operations, it has also rescheduled and moved forward on already-planned upgrades. These upgrades are not related to the root cause, but rather preventative maintenance.

Vestas expects that all of the paused turbines will be returned to normal operation by the end of the month.

The company is also awaiting the reports from two external experts who worked side by side with Vestas investigators. These reports are expected within a few weeks.



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