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LM Glasfiber, a Denmark-headquartered manufacturer of fiberglass blades, has announced plans to open a global business office in Amsterdam, Netherlands by September 2007. The office will employ approximately 20 to 30 people in key international group support functions and will provide state-of-the-art meeting, communication, conferencing and business facilities, LM Glasfiber notes.

The new office will be located in the World Trade Center at the Schiphol Airport. LM Glasfiber adds that this site is directly linked to the Schiphol airport terminal and railway station and that the slip roads to the A4, A5 and A9 motorways are nearby.

"We are currently growing our business in Asia, North America and Southern Europe, and we must respond fast and effectively to strong global demand. To that point, we are transforming the way we collaborate in cross-functional, global teams on all levels of our organization to ensure a close link between plan and execution. Our global business office will enable us to drive and manage our growth more effectively," says Roland M. Sundén, chief executive officer of LM Glasfiber.



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