in News Departments > FYI
print the content item

A small fire broke out Friday inside the structure housing a 10 MWh battery-based energy-storage system at the new Kahuku wind farm in Oahu, Hawaii, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser reports.

The blaze had been extinguished by the time firefighters arrived on the scene, at around 6 p.m. Friday night. Hazardous-materials experts assessed the damages on Saturday and determined that the site was safe.

The project was developed by Massachusetts-based First Wind, which hopes to have the facility back online as soon as possible.

"First Wind reported to Honolulu fire officials that there was smoke at our Kahuku Wind facility, in the battery energy-storage building," said First Wind spokesperson John Lamontagne in a statement. "The cause of the fire is not known and is being investigated."

The energy-storage system, which was manufactured by Texas-based Xtreme Power, helps balance the output variability of the 30 MW wind farm, which was dedicated late last month.


Trachte Inc._id1770
Latest Top Stories

Wind And Solar Helped California Grid During Challenging Summer

According to the California Independent System Operator, the state suffered from heat waves and drought this year, and wind power played a "significant role" in keeping the lights on.


Recapping The Wind Industry's Third-Quarter Deals

Mercom Capital Group recaps investment and merger and acquisition activity during July, August and September.


Yearly Installed Capacity Figures Already Beat 2013 Numbers, More Wind On The Way: AWEA

While the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) lobbies Congress to extend the production tax credit, the association notes wind projects now under construction signal a vibrant 2015.


Yahoo Inks Contract To Buy Kansas Wind Power

The Internet company plans to log in to the Alexander wind project, which is being built by community developer OwnEnergy.


Could Initial Offshore Wind Projects Crash New England's REC Market?

Some are concerned that the first offshore wind projects could negatively impact pricing of renewable energy credits (RECs) in New England.

Canwea_id1984
Hybrid Energy Innovations 2015
Renewable NRG_id1934
BG 2015DblBox_id2032