in News Departments > Policy Watch
print the content item

Gov. Ted Kulongoski, D-Ore., has issued vetoes on H.B.2472 and H.B.2940, which relate to reducing renewable energy incentives and standards.

H.B.2472 reduces the Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) cap from $10 million to $3.5 million - a reduction that the governor believes goes too far and would put Oregon at a competitive disadvantage in growing the state's renewable energy sector, resulting in fewer jobs and fewer renewable energy sources. The bill would also expand the BETC to cover electric vehicle manufacturing and supporting parts.

"The BETC has aided the renewable energy industry, which, in turn, has provided much-needed jobs, while transitioning the state towards cleaner, renewable energy sources," said the governor in a letter to Oregon's secretary of state. "I cannot support a bill that would scale back our support for one of the few growing sectors of our economy at a time when encouraging new economic opportunity is so critically important."

In addition to the veto, the governor signed H.B.2180, which directs the Oregon Department of Energy to conduct an economic analysis on renewable energy projects that qualify for the BETC.

In his letter, the governor also directed the Oregon Department of Energy to tighten the administrative rules that govern the BETC.

H.B.2940 would diminish the value of Oregon's renewable portfolio standard (RPS) by including additional sources of generation not accounted for in the original standard at the expense of new renewable generation projects.

In the letter, Kulongoski recognized the efforts by the bill's proponents to create additional economic opportunities for biomass facilities in Oregon built prior to 1995 and efforts to mitigate some of the bill's adverse impacts the RPS, but he reiterated that he could not support the bill because of its diminishing effect the RPS.

SOURCE: Office of Gov. Ted Kulongoski


Trachte Inc._id1770
Latest Top Stories

Wind And Solar Are Catching Up With Nuclear Power, Says Report

A new report from the Worldwatch Institute says nuclear energy's share of global power production is steadily shrinking. Meanwhile, renewables' share keeps growing.


Could New Desert Plan Spell The End Of California Wind Energy Development?

The California Wind Energy Association says it is disappointed with the draft Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan, which was recently released by state and federal agencies.


New U.S. House Bill Includes Wind PTC Extension

U.S. representatives have introduced the Bridge to a Clean Energy Future Act of 2014, which would extend the production tax credit (PTC) and other provisions through 2016.


Utility-Scale Wind And Solar Keep Getting Cheaper

A new study measures the levelized cost of energy from various technologies and suggests that the costs of utility-scale wind and solar power are catching up with those of traditional sources, even without subsidies.


The Song Remains The Same: Ontario Seeks More Science Before Lifting Offshore Ban

The Ontario government says the nearly four-year-old offshore wind moratorium will remain in place until the province fully understands the technology’s impact on the environment.

Renewable NRG_id1934
Canwea_id1984
Future Energy_id2008