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StatoilHydro and Siemens have installed a large-scale floating wind turbine approximately 12 kilometers southeast of Karmoy in Norway at a water depth of about 220 meters.

The Hywind project was developed by StatoilHydro, and Siemens supplied the SWT 2.3 MW wind turbine with a rotor diameter of 82 meters. Over the next two years, the floating wind turbine will be tested to provide a thorough analysis of this concept. The Hywind turbine will be connected to the local grid and is expected to start producing power in mid-July.

Hywind is designed to be suitable for installation in water depths of 120 meters to 700 meters, which could open up for many new possibilities within offshore wind turbine technology, according to Siemens.

"Hywind could open new opportunities for exploitation of offshore wind power, as the turbines could be placed much more freely than before," says Henrik Stiesdal, chief technology officer of Siemens' wind power business unit.

StatoilHydro is responsible for the floating structure, which consists of a steel floater filled with ballast. This floating element extends 100 meters beneath the surface and is fastened to the seabed by three anchor wires.

StatoilHydro and Siemens have jointly developed a special control system for the Hywind turbine to address the special operating conditions of a floating structure. In particular, the advanced control system takes advantage of the turbine's ability to dampen out part of the wave-induced motions of the floating system.

SOURCE: Siemens AG


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