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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed the first comprehensive national system for reporting emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions produced by major sources in the U.S.

In developing the reporting requirements, EPA considered the substantial amount of work already completed and under way in many states, regions and voluntary programs.

The new reporting requirements would apply to suppliers of fossil fuel and industrial chemicals, manufacturers of motor vehicles and engines, as well as large direct emitters of GHGs with emissions equal to or greater than a threshold of 25,000 metric tons per year. The vast majority of small businesses would not be required to report their emissions because their emissions fall well below the threshold.

The direct emission sources covered under the reporting requirement would include energy-intensive sectors such as cement production, iron and steel production, and electricity generation, among others.

The first annual report would be submitted to EPA in 2011 for the calendar year 2010, except for vehicle and engine manufacturers, which would begin reporting for model year 2011.

EPA estimates that the expected cost to comply with the reporting requirements to the private sector would be $160 million for the first year. In subsequent years, the annualized costs for the private sector would be $127 million.

EPA is developing this rule under the authority of the Clean Air Act. The proposed rule will be open for public comment for 60 days after publication in the Federal Register. Two public hearings will be held during the comment period.

SOURCE: Environmental Protection Agency


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