in News Departments > New & Noteworthy
print the content item

Devens, Mass.-based American Superconductor Corp. (AMSC) has received its first order for a D-VAR system to meet dynamic reactive compensation requirements for a 220 kV power transmission grid in Inner Mongolia, China. Reactive power compensation is necessary to stabilize voltage, relieve power grid congestion, improve electrical efficiency and prevent blackouts in power grids, according to the company.

Beijing SNTA Electric Power Technique Co. Ltd. (SNTA), which has ordered the 16 MegaVAR D-VAR system, is AMSC's first channel partner for the Chinese power grid market. SNTA will install the D-VAR system in the 220 kV Xijiao substation, which is located in Chifeng and is operated by North East Power Grid. SNTA is one of China's primary suppliers of low- and high-voltage reactive compensation products and turnkey power grid solutions.

The Xijiao substation is connected to seven wind farms that produce a combined 600 MW of power. The China Electric Power Research Institute, which is a part of China's State Grid Corp. and is responsible for transmission engineering, has determined that additional voltage support is required at the Chifeng Xijiao substation to maintain reliable operation of the power grid served by this substation and enable secure transmission of wind-generated electricity to load centers.

AMSC expects to deliver the D-VAR system to SNTA by the middle of this year. According to the International Energy Agency, China's power grid will require approximately $1.5 trillion in investments by 2030.

American Superconductor Corp.


Trachte Inc._id1770
Latest Top Stories

Federal Appeals Court Finds Obama's Wind Farm Decision Unconstitutional

A federal appeals court ruled that the U.S. government violated the constitutional rights of Chinese-owned Ralls Corp. when ordering the divestment of four Oregon wind farms.


Renewables Make Up Over 50% Of New U.S. Power In First Half Of 2014

According to a recent government report, renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, continue to dominate new electric generating capacity.


Suzlon Facility Lends Key Assist In Developing 'The Wind Technicians Of Tomorrow'

The turbine manufacturer’s Elgin, Ill.-based training facility is the culmination of a program that puts a new twist on a proven method of instruction.


Having Their Say: CanWEA Clarifies True Source Of Canadian Wind Success

The Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) takes issue with a recent report summary regarding various renewable energy policies in North America.


FWS Issues Landmark Eagle Take Permit: What Does It Mean For Wind Projects?

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's (FWS) recent decision has far-ranging implications for operating wind farms, as well as for those under development.

Renewable NRG_id1934
Navigant_id1983