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Devens, Mass.-based American Superconductor Corp. (AMSC), has manufactured and shipped approximately 56,000 feet of its proprietary second generation high temperature superconductor (HTS) wire, branded as 344 superconductors, for use in Project HYDRA.

Project HYDRA relies upon the development of new fault current limiting technology, which is partially funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate.

The project focuses on the development and deployment of AMSC's secure super grids (SSG) technology in the power delivery network of Manhattan, operated by Consolidated Edison Co. DHS is providing up to $25 million of the $39 million project. AMSC is both the wire supplier and the prime contractor for the project. Ultera, a joint venture between Southwire Co. and nkt cables, is the cable manufacturer.

"We successfully completed tests of an initial trial SSG cable and have now shipped all of the wire necessary for the first system prototype," says Daniel McGahn, senior vice president and general manager of AMSC Superconductors. "We look forward to successfully testing this prototype in 2009 and deploying the full solution in Manhattan in 2010."

AMSC delivered this initial shipment of 344 superconductors to Ultera's operations in Germany for the production of the prototype SSG cable. Testing of the prototype will be performed in conjunction with Oak Ridge National Laboratory and is expected to be complete in 2009. The full-scale HTS power cable system will connect two of Con Edison's Manhattan substations.

SOURCE: American Superconductor Corp.


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