in News Departments > New & Noteworthy
print the content item

The U.S. Climate Change Science Program has released the report "Climate Models: An Assessment of Strengths and Limitations," the 10th release in a series of 21 synthesis and assessment products (SAPs) managed by U.S. federal agencies. Developed under the leadership of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), this report - SAP 3.1 - describes computer models of the Earth's climate and their ability to simulate current climate change.

The SAP 3.1 report notes that "the science of climate modeling has matured through finer spatial resolution, the inclusion of a greater number of physical processes and through comparison to a rapidly expanding array of observations." The authors find that the "models have important strengths and limitations." The report assesses how well models simulate the recent observational period; it does not deal with climate change predictions.

The report documents the improvement in climate model fidelity over the past decade. As emphasized by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, modern models faithfully simulate continental-to-global scale temperature patterns and trends observed during the 20th century. Despite this progress, a number of systematic biases across the set of climate models remain, particularly in the simulation of regional precipitation.

On smaller geographic scales, when compared against the current climate, the simulated climate varies substantially from model to model. The report notes that "an average over the set of models clearly provides climate simulation superior to any individual model" and concludes that "no current model is superior to others in all respects, but rather, different models have differing strengths and weaknesses."

For more information, visit climatescience.gov/

SOURCE: U.S. Climate Change Science Program


Trachte Inc._id1770
Latest Top Stories

Wind And Solar Are Catching Up With Nuclear Power, Says Report

A new report from the Worldwatch Institute says nuclear energy's share of global power production is steadily shrinking. Meanwhile, renewables' share keeps growing.


Could New Desert Plan Spell The End Of California Wind Energy Development?

The California Wind Energy Association says it is disappointed with the draft Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan, which was recently released by state and federal agencies.


New U.S. House Bill Includes Wind PTC Extension

U.S. representatives have introduced the Bridge to a Clean Energy Future Act of 2014, which would extend the production tax credit (PTC) and other provisions through 2016.


Utility-Scale Wind And Solar Keep Getting Cheaper

A new study measures the levelized cost of energy from various technologies and suggests that the costs of utility-scale wind and solar power are catching up with those of traditional sources, even without subsidies.


The Song Remains The Same: Ontario Seeks More Science Before Lifting Offshore Ban

The Ontario government says the nearly four-year-old offshore wind moratorium will remain in place until the province fully understands the technology’s impact on the environment.

Canwea_id1984
Renewable NRG_id1934
Future Energy_id2008