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Kulpsville, Pa.-based SKF USA has introduced MRC hybrid ceramic ball bearings in extra-large bore sizes suited for wind power generator applications. These bearing solutions combine traditional 52100 steel rings precision matched with silicon nitride (ceramic) balls offering insulating properties to protect against electrical arcing and potential bearing damage, according to the company.

The bearings are specially designed to fit new or installed turbines, which are prone to electrical arcing from the passage of electric currents. Such arcing can result in surface damage to bearing raceways, excessive noise and premature lubricant aging leading to potential bearing failure, generator breakdown and unplanned turbine downtime.

The extra-large bore sizes range from 100 millimeters to 160 millimeters, and can be engineered with seals and shields or otherwise customized through the MRC made-to-order warranted products program.

For more information, visit skfusa.com

SOURCE: SKF USA

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