in News Departments > New & Noteworthy
print the content item

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has denied requests for rehearing of the Mid-Atlantic and the Southwest Area national interest electric transmission corridors (NIETCs) designated by DOE in October 2007 as areas of significant electricity congestion and constraint.

The designation of national corridors was made in accordance with the Energy Policy Act of 2005. In affirming the NIETC designations, DOE dismissed the challenges being raised by the applicants for rehearing as being without merit challenges raised by the applicants for rehearing, citing extensive data analysis conducted in its 2006 National Interest Electric Transmission study, ample opportunity for public review and comment, and several other key reasons. DOE noted that the findings of congestion in the designated areas are well-founded and based on data and studies as required by statute and were based on analysis demonstrating that persistent transmission congestion that adversely affects consumers exists in these two areas.

DOE also highlighted that its approach to defining the geographic boundaries of the affected areas is consistent with the statutory requirements. The corridor designation process provided all interested parties with fair and ample opportunities to provide input and comments, including a 60-day public comment period and over 60 hours of public meetings across the country. Additionally, after issuing the draft NIETCs in April 2007, DOE consulted extensively with state officials and local agencies, regional entities and the public.

In addition, while DOE encourages diversification of energy sources, it is not required by statute to analyze non-transmission alternatives for relief of congestion prior to issuing a NIETC designation.

Lastly, federal statutes such as the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act and the National Historic Preservation Act, are not applicable to DOE's designation of national corridors. Rather, reviews under these statutes would be conducted by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission before federal approval could be granted under the Federal Power Act for the construction of a transmission project.


Mortenson Construction_id2024

Trachte Inc._id1770
Latest Top Stories

Yearly Installed Capacity Figures Already Beat 2013 Numbers, More Wind On The Way: AWEA

While the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) lobbies Congress to extend the production tax credit, the association notes wind projects now under construction signal a vibrant 2015.


Yahoo Inks Contract To Buy Kansas Wind Power

The Internet company plans to log in to the Alexander wind project, which is being built by community developer OwnEnergy.


Could Initial Offshore Wind Projects Crash New England's REC Market?

Some are concerned that the first offshore wind projects could negatively impact pricing of renewable energy credits (RECs) in New England.


Catching Up With The DOE's Down-Select Offshore Winners

The three recipients of key U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provide updates on their offshore wind demonstration projects.


Texas Comptroller Attacks Wind Power, And Industry Fights Back

Texas Comptroller Susan Combs recently released a report calling for an end to wind power subsidies. The Wind Coalition has responded, saying the report is riddled with misinformation.

Canwea_id1984
Renewable NRG_id1934