ABB_id2059
in News Departments > New & Noteworthy
print the content item

The renewable electricity standard (RES) in the pending House and Senate energy legislation, if adopted, would cut consumer energy bills and carbon dioxide emissions (CO2), as well as stimulate job growth, according to an analysis done by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE).

According to ACEEE, which authored the five-month study, the RES would, in 2030, reduce CO2 emissions by 100 million metric tons, save 22 billion kWh of electricity usage, create 21,000 net new jobs, and displace a total of 32 conventional power plants with a generating capacity of 500 MW each. This proposal would save consumers $5 billion in 2030 and a cumulative $60.5 billion through 2030.

The direct energy-efficiency savings and the indirect impacts of efficiency and renewable energy on natural gas and coal prices more than offset the slightly higher cost of renewable energy, according to the report.

The study further examined these renewable and efficiency policies against a climate policy framework similar to the Lieberman-Warner America's Climate Security Act under consideration by the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

These scenarios showed even greater benefits in terms of lower energy prices, greater consumer savings and a stronger economy from setting RES and resource targets.

"Renewable electricity and energy-efficiency policies should be cornerstones of our climate policy," says Bill Prindle, ACEEE's policy director. "By enacting the RES in the energy bill, Congress can make the best down payment possible on reducing carbon emissions in the electricity sector."

For more information on the report, visit aceee.org.

IOWA Economic Development id2073

Trachte_id2056
Latest Top Stories

More Investors Entering Tax Equity Market; Returns Holding Steady

The entry of new tax equity investors to the wind space last year re-ignited an old debate.


Report: Top 10 Turbine OEMs Had Record Year In 2014

Preliminary findings suggest Vestas reigned supreme again among the world's leading wind turbine makers. How did some of the other OEMs fare?


AWEA's Gramlich To FERC: Additional Transmission Needed Regardless Of Clean Power Plan

To further build a more balanced and reliable electricity portfolio, the U.S. needs to build more transmission capacity.


Getting A Grip On Grinding Gearboxes: Why Such Events Need Not Be Showstoppers

Despite advances in gearbox reliability - namely, from condition monitoring systems and greater design standardization - challenges remain.


How Wind Energy Can Meet EPA Clean Power Plan Requirements

According to the American Wind Energy Association, wind power is a cost-effective solution for complying with the environmental effort.

Hybrid Energy Innovations 2015