in News Departments > FYI
print the content item

More and more energy executives believe the U.S. can attain energy independence within the next 15 years, eliminating the nation's dependency on foreign energy sources, according to the results of an annual survey by the KPMG Global Energy Institute.

KPMG's survey, which polled more than 100 senior executives in the U.S. representing global energy companies, found that nearly three-quarters (73%) of energy executives believe the U.S. can attain energy independence by 2030 or sooner - up 10 percentage points from KPMG's 2013 survey. Of those 73%, 17% believe the U.S. could fully meet current energy demand with only U.S.-based sources by 2020.

Other than the continued development of conventional and unconventional domestic energy reserves, the KPMG survey found that 37% of executives cite the development of energy transportation infrastructure such as pipelines and transmission lines as the most important action they believe the U.S. should take to attain energy independence. However, 23% also cite greater use of renewable energy sources, and 20% point to greater use of alternative fuels for transportation, including natural gas, electricity and biodiesel.

Mortenson Construction_id2024

Trachte Inc._id1770
Latest Top Stories

Wind And Solar Helped California Grid During Challenging Summer

According to the California Independent System Operator, the state suffered from heat waves and drought this year, and wind power played a "significant role" in keeping the lights on.


Recapping The Wind Industry's Third-Quarter Deals

Mercom Capital Group recaps investment and merger and acquisition activity during July, August and September.


Yearly Installed Capacity Figures Already Beat 2013 Numbers, More Wind On The Way: AWEA

While the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) lobbies Congress to extend the production tax credit, the association notes wind projects now under construction signal a vibrant 2015.


Yahoo Inks Contract To Buy Kansas Wind Power

The Internet company plans to log in to the Alexander wind project, which is being built by community developer OwnEnergy.


Could Initial Offshore Wind Projects Crash New England's REC Market?

Some are concerned that the first offshore wind projects could negatively impact pricing of renewable energy credits (RECs) in New England.

Renewable NRG_id1934
Hybrid Energy Innovations 2015
BG 2015DblBox_id2032
Canwea_id1984