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ACCIONA has signed a contract to supply 34 turbines for a 102 MW wind farm in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. The company will carry out the construction, internal electrical infrastructures and assembly, as well as undertake the operations and maintenance of the facility.

The South Canoe wind farm, which the company claims will be the largest in Nova Scotia, has been developed by three local companies: Oxford Frozen Foods, Minas Basin Pulp and Power, and the utility company Nova Scotia Power, to which the power generated will be sold. The project will use ACCIONA Windpower AW3000/116 wind turbines, each with a capacity of 3 MW, hub height of 92 meters and a rotor diameter of 116 meters.

Nova Scotia-based DSME Trenton Ltd. (DSTN) will be producing the project’s turbine towers. “Having worked with ACCIONA Windpower in the past, we are looking forward to continuing to build a strong relationship with this leading turbine manufacturer,” comments DSTN CEO M. J. Park. “We are confident that, through hard work and dedication, this project will have a positive outcome for everyone involved.”



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