in News Departments > New & Noteworthy
print the content item

Largely thanks to renewable portfolio standards, the Midwest is a renewable energy hub and accounts for over a third of U.S. wind power capacity, according to a report from the American Council On Renewable Energy (ACORE).

The Midwestern Region Report, the second in ACORE's four-part 6th annual Renewable Energy in the 50 States report, focuses on the clean energy sector in the 12 Midwest states: Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin.

“The past couple of years have seen an impressive increase in renewable energy sector activity throughout the American Midwest. Eight of the 12 states we examine in this new report have strong binding standards for renewable and/or clean energy, plus an additional three have non-binding goals,” explains Lesley Hunter, ACORE’s research and program manager and lead author of the report

“With strong renewable portfolio standards in place, the political will to protect and expand them, and the market stability they bring, these states are certain to protect their large domestic market share.”

According to the Midwestern Region Report, technologies suited for expansion in the region include biomass, solar, hydropower, waste energy, biofuels and wind, among other clean technologies.

In the report, ACORE says five Midwest states generate over 10% of their electricity from wind energy, out of only nine states nationally. Last year resulted in a 29% increase in installed generation capacity in the Midwest, adding over 21 GW of new wind power to the grid, the report notes. However, ACORE says uncertainty caused by congressional debate over the production tax credit, coupled with transmission constraints, has resulted in far fewer wind power facilities to be built to date in 2013.

“The 12 states that comprise the American Midwest are home to nationally recognized bioenergy and wind energy resources,” says Hunter. “Furthermore, smaller-scale renewable energy sources are also experiencing growth in the region. Midwestern solar power capacity, for example, experienced a 150 percent jump in 2012.

“State renewable portfolio standards have been the single largest driver of this growth and expansion. Only one state of our 12 - Nebraska - does not have any sort of binding/nonbinding standard,” Hunter continues. “It is therefore no surprise to see Nebraska come in last for renewable power in the Midwestern States Installed Capacity Rankings.”

This September, ACORE released its Western Region Report, and both the Northeast and the Southeast Region Reports will come out within the next few months.



Trachte Inc._id1770
Latest Top Stories

The Song Remains The Same: Ontario Seeks More Science Before Lifting Offshore Ban

The Ontario government says the nearly four-year-old offshore wind moratorium will remain in place until the province fully understands the technology’s impact on the environment.


Why States Should Adopt A Renewable Portfolio Standard

A new study analyzes the potential benefits of state renewable energy mandates, as well as recommends what such policies should include.


Sen. Reid Vows To Bring Wind PTC To A Vote By Year's End

Nevada's senior senator provides some encouragement to wind industry advocates during his annual Clean Energy Summit.


Steadily, Wind Turbine OEMs Resume R&D Investment

An increased commitment to research and development will likely lead to wind energy innovation - not to mention a likely increase in patent-protected technology.


Quebec Government Postpones Wind Power RFP; No New Date Scheduled

The request for proposals (RFP) is part of an overall 800 MW wind power tranche that will serve as a bridge to the next phase in the province's energy future.

Renewable NRG_id1934
Canwea_id1984
Future Energy_id2008
UnitedEquip_id1995