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At the end of a six-day march on Sept. 2, about 200 climate activists rallied in Cape Cod, Mass., in support of building the Cape Wind offshore wind farm. The 468 MW wind project is planned to be built in Nantucket Sound.

At the rally, speakers targeted oil tycoon Bill Koch, claiming he had funded efforts to impede the construction of Cape Wind since the project's proposal in 2001. The protestors also called on the Town of Barnstable, Mass., to end lawsuits against the project.

“Cape Wind will be a landmark achievement for our country, bringing us closer to a clean energy economy, healthy communities and a stable climate - and creating 1,000 jobs in the process,” said Ben Thompson, who co-organized the event.

The rally finished a six-day, 66-mile “Energy Exodus” march, which was developed by the Better Future Project and Students for a Just and Stable Future. According to the groups, the marchers hoped that the march would highlight the need to transition from fossil fuels to clean energy sources and build political momentum to speed up that transition.

The march began on Aug. 28th with a rally near the Brayton Point coal and gas plant, calling for Gov. Deval Patrick to close all coal plants in Massachusetts, replace them with renewable energy, and ensure a just transition for affected workers and communities. In towns along the route, the marchers held other events, including a sustainable food feast, an educational panel on climate solutions and a rally for green jobs.

“It has been beautiful to see people of all ages coming together to fight not only against our dependence on fossil fuels, but for the solutions we know are possible,” said Emily Edgerly, a marcher with Students for a Just and Stable Future. “We no longer have the time to wait for our government to act, we have to get in the streets and demand the clean energy solutions we so desperately need.”







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