in News Departments > New & Noteworthy
print the content item

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) has taken new steps toward eliminating coal from Los Angeles' power supply. Representatives of LADWP and Salt River Project have reached what the utilities describe as "sufficient progress on the principle terms" to sell LADWP's stake in Navajo Generating Station (NGS), a 477 MW coal plant.

The utilities plan to move forward to negotiate a definitive agreement that would end Los Angeles' use of coal-fired power from the plant by the end of 2015. If a final agreement can be reached and approved by each party's governing bodies, this will end LADWP's role in NGS more than four years earlier than mandated by California state law.

Additionally, LADWP's Board of Water and Power Commissioners has approved a contract that will enable LADWP to completely transition out of coal power from the Intermountain Power Plant in Delta, Utah, by 2025 at the latest, with efforts to begin that transition no later than 2020.

LADWP says the announcements reflect a transformation of the city's power supply to renewable energy, such as wind and solar.

"The era of coal is over," says Antonio Villaraigosa, mayor of Los Angeles. "Today we affirm our commitment to make Los Angeles a cleaner, greener, more sustainable city. By divesting from coal and investing in renewable energy and energy efficiency, we reduce our carbon footprint and set a precedent for the national power market."




Trachte Inc._id1770
Latest Top Stories

Recapping The Wind Industry's Third-Quarter Deals

Mercom Capital Group recaps investment and merger and acquisition activity during July, August and September.


Yearly Installed Capacity Figures Already Beat 2013 Numbers, More Wind On The Way: AWEA

While the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) lobbies Congress to extend the production tax credit, the association notes wind projects now under construction signal a vibrant 2015.


Yahoo Inks Contract To Buy Kansas Wind Power

The Internet company plans to log in to the Alexander wind project, which is being built by community developer OwnEnergy.


Could Initial Offshore Wind Projects Crash New England's REC Market?

Some are concerned that the first offshore wind projects could negatively impact pricing of renewable energy credits (RECs) in New England.


Catching Up With The DOE's Down-Select Offshore Winners

The three recipients of key U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provide updates on their offshore wind demonstration projects.

Renewable NRG_id1934
Hybrid Energy Innovations 2015
Canwea_id1984